Degrees of significance

Bowling Alley Score Sheet by Steve Snodgrass via flickr CC

I’ve mentioned before that my book club uses a rating system on books – we put a score out of 5 against our name on a card in the back of the book and then everyone else knows who enjoyed it, who couldn’t finish it and so on.  This is really useful in a group where everyone’s reading preferences are different – you can work out who else likes the same books you do and pick those up to read.

The rating system over the years has been controversial.  At the very first meeting more than 10 years ago we decided on a scale of 1-5 where 1 = couldn’t finish it and 5 = couldn’t put it down wish I could read it again tomorrow.  We have never allowed half points – preferring to make people commit one way or the other.  Some of us love the no half points, others hate it and it comes up for discussion at least a couple of times a year.

I was thinking about this system in relation to some quantitative outcome measurement we do at MPOW.  One of the measurements we use is ‘significant’ – in the context of has this resulted in significant change from the way things were before.  I had a meeting on Thursday that I think had ‘very significant’ outcomes – but just like my book club, there are no degrees of significance in the system so we can’t sit on the fence, and I don’t think it merits the next measurement up in the scale, so significant it shall stay.

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  1. Pingback: A library day in the life – Round 8 « Opinions from an OPL

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